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The Latest: Tornadoes cause damage, injuries in…

Two weak tornadoes have hit North Texas, demolishing at least one mobile home and damaging about a dozen others in a rural area and damaging the roofs of homes in a Dallas suburb

You Could Buy Michelangelo's Villa (if You Have…

If you’ve got $9 million burning a hole in your pocket, you could buy a Tuscan farmhouse once owned by Michelangelo. Buzz60's Josh King has more.

Kate Middleton Might've Worn A Green Dress To The…

The Duchess of Cambridge wore a dark-green gown to the BAFTAs, and social media users on Twitter expressed their disappointment.

North Korea Reportedly Bailed On A Secret Meeting…

The U.S. vice president was reportedly supposed to meet with North Korean officials while he was in South Korea for the Olympics.

The Winter Olympics Are Here!

Watch live coverage of The Winter Olympics on NBCUniversal Networks. Watch now!

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Ursula K. Le Guin wins posthumous prize for essay writing

Late Ursula K. Le Guin among recipients of literary honors presented at New York ceremony by PEN America

Option play is his big pitch for Kershaw

Serena Williams Calls for Action After Scary…

Serena Williams nearly died after her daughter was born via emergency C-section last year; a pulmonary embolism "sparked a slew of health complications that I am lucky to have survived," the tennis star writes for CNN . Living through the experience made Williams realize even though it was terrifying, she's one...

Some fear California drought cuts could erase…

Some water agencies say a plan to make California's drought-era water restrictions permanent could allow the state to chip away at long-held water rights

A New Study Just Rewrote the History Book on…

The arrival of plants on Earth changed the planet and its inhabitants in big ways, and a new study suggests they arrived far earlier than thought. University of Bristol researchers now say that land plants evolved from pond scum about 500 million years ago—a whopping 100 million years earlier...

GOP candidate defends campaign's AR-15 giveaway

Kansas congressional candidate Tyler Tannahill defends continuing his campaign's AR-15 giveaway in the wake of the Parkland, Florida, school shooting, saying, "I do support the Second Amendment in the hard times and the bad."

Insiders: Russia troll farm even zanier than…

Insiders say the U.S. indictment against the St. Petersburg troll farm only scratches the surface of the agency's zany, ambitious operations _ and glosses over just how unconvincing some of its stunts could be

Elon Musk's Hyperloop Makes Headway in DC

Elon Musk's dream of building a hyperloop that can move people between Washington, DC, and New York City in 29 minutes may be a small step closer to becoming a distant reality. A Nov. 29 permit issued by DC's Department of Transportation allows Musk's Boring Company to dig at an...

Asian shares gain on rosy Japan data, bucking…

Shares gain in Asia, supported by rosy manufacturing data from Japan

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Parents of fraternity pledge file civil suit over…

The parents of a Florida State University fraternity pledge who died after a party files civil suit against fraternity's national chapter and others

Leader of movement to remember Holocaust victims dies at 93

Holocaust survivor Sam Bloch, who dedicated his life to preserving the memory of the victims of Nazi atrocities, dies at age 93

Millennials Have The Most Patience For Bad…

In the battle between who can keep their cool the longest, Millennials came out on top.

What Do The BAFTA Winners Say About The Upcoming…

"Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" won five of the top honors at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts movie awards.

The CDC Says A Salmonella Outbreak Might Be…

Kratom, which the FDA classifies as an herbal supplement, may be linked to 28 cases of salmonella.

Any Show. Any Screen. Anywhere.

EXP from Armstrong brings you television, broadband wireless Internet, and endless entertainment. The new interface powered by TiVo makes it easy to find the content you want and so much more!

California law that blocked posting actors' ages struck down

A federal judge has struck down a California law that restricts a popular Hollywood website from posting the ages of actors

Trump plan: Less health insurance for lower…

Latest Trump administration health care idea: less insurance for lower premiums

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3M to pay $850 million to settle suit over…

3M Co. has agreed to pay the state of Minnesota $850 million to settle a major case alleging the manufacturer damaged natural resources and contaminated groundwater by disposing of chemicals over decades

Plants have been around for 100 million years…

Previous assumptions about the age of ancient plant species is being thrown into question today, as new research suggests that flora took root here on Earth over 100 million years earlier than scientists presumed. A study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences used a new calculation method to determine where on Earths' timeline plants initially appeared. As it turns out, all previous guesses may have been way, way off. The study has some pretty serious implications in regards to how scientists view the very earliest phases of life's spread across the globe, and could help us better understand the long and winding road that eventually resulted in the planet we inhabit today. To get a better idea of how far back plant life dates, the researchers used what they call a "molecular clock" method to analyze genetic changes over time and link them to their predecessors. This work, which is a bit like painting a massive family tree of the earliest plant life which can be used to calculate how far back in time it truly stretches. Needless to say, the resulting data doesn't match well with previously-held assumptions. "The fossil record is too sparse and incomplete to be a reliable guide to date the origin of land plants. Instead of relying on the fossil record alone, we used a 'molecular clock' approach to compare differences in the make-up of genes of living species - these relative genetic differences were then converted into ages by using the fossil ages as a loose framework," Mark Puttick, co-lead author of the study, explains. "Our results show the ancestor of land plants was alive in the middle Cambrian Period, which was similar to the age for the first known terrestrial animals." This new work could be an important addition to future research into the emergence of plants and animals on Earth, as well as a helpful tool in modeling how climate changed in the earliest days of life on this planet.

Late-Night Uber Eats Delivery Ends With Dead…

An Uber Eats driver claims he was acting in self-defense when he killed a customer during his first week on the job. Robert Bivines, 36, arrived at the Atlanta condominium of 30-year-old Ryan Thornton around 11:30pm Saturday after a $27 food order was placed at Tin Lizzy's through the...